Could This Be What Ignites the Fireworks in Your Funeral Home Marketing Campaign?

(NOTE: Monitoring your funeral home’s online reputation is a requirement for success in the digital age. Try our free Review Scan now for an instant reputation report on your funeral home.) 

We’re approaching the fourth of July, and what’s more appropriate than a post that pairs funeral home marketing with fireworks? The answer is: a solid marketing tip that helps you ignite your marketing and capture more attention online.

Before we tell you what that tip is, first we need to explain what a punk is. A punk is a wooden stick that smolders slowly like incense. It’s designed to keep a small, burning tip that can be used to light fireworks easier than when using a match or lighter.

Punks are what many families use to ignite their homegrown fireworks shows (where it’s legal) on fourth of July evenings.

What does that have to do with funeral home marketing? Plenty.

Consider this: Someone lighting fireworks has a source of flame. It might be a campfire, a Zippo, or a box of matches. The punk doesn’t provide a source of flame—it provides a convenient way to transfer the flame to the firework. And the firework provides the boom and dazzling light display that really matters.

As a funeral home with an online presence, you have content (and if you don’t, we need to talk). But you need an easy way to transfer interest in that content to online users so that something goes boom for them. It’s a metaphorical boom—the proverbial light bulb moment. It’s the spark that makes them realize you might have the answers they’re seeking so that they click on your link.

That punk is a meta description. It’s the one or two sentence teaser that appears below your link in the search engine. Its job is to persuade the reader that your link is the one they need.

Many firms never create meta descriptions, so Google just grabs some content from the pages. That content may or may not do a decent job acting as your punk. And since it’s not especially time consuming or expensive to create meta descriptions for all your pages, do you really want to let Google control this?

While meta descriptions don’t directly impact SEO, pages that have a unique description typically garner higher clicks than those that don’t. And pages with a full-length description—taking up at least the 160 or so characters Google shows—perform 36% better on average than those that publish shorter descriptions.

Are meta descriptions a huge part of the content marketing show? No. But like punks, they can be what ignites your funeral home marketing. And they’re inexpensive and easy to use, so why not ensure that you’re putting them to work?